Lighter Protective Case

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Color
Bourbon Brown
Lavender
Swayze Suede
  • Keep Your Lighter Protected and Light Up In Style
  • Rustic Metal Clasp, Available in Multiple Colors
  • Handmade From Rustic Full Grain Leather
  • Appearance Improves with Age and Usage
  • Use In or Out of the Protector

SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions

Length: 3.25 Inches

Height: 0.5 Inches

Width: 2.25 Inches

Materials

Full Grain Leather, Brass Metal Snaps

USE & CARE

Over time and with use, the leather will assume a unique patina. If desired, condition with mineral oil or beeswax leather conditioner.

PRODUCTION & DESIGN

This leather all purpose kit with rustic accents is meant to be passed on to future generations.

Use this stylish, fine leather product to separate your disposable lighter from the rest. Easy to replace, and simple to light either in or out of the case, give your lighter a chic, rustic home. Provides a snug fit to all major brand lighters of this size, and shows off the beauty of Guatemala every time you light up.

Tobacco has a long history, dating back to the early Americas. It became extremely popular with the arrival of the Europeans who made a fortune from trading it. Native Americans did not smoke it recreationally, instead it was seen as a tool for sacred ceremonies or to mark a treaty or agreement. To Eastern North American tribes, the tobacco was thought of as a gift from their 'Creator' and the smoke from the tobacco was considered to be a vessel to carry prayers and thoughts to the spirits.

In some communities here in the highlands of Guatemala, a saint folk that takes many forms known as Maximón, or San Simón, is praised with tobacco and alcohol. It is said that his form derives from a pre-Colombian Maya God Mam, and that the word Maximón is a combination of the word Max, the Mam word for tobacco, and Simón. Local people will pay him in the form of money, licor and cigars to help them with problems they are facing, praying for his blessing and assistance. 

The leather we use, originating from our well-established supplier Compiel, is only Full Grain Leather, and if you don't know what that is, then make sure you're sitting comfortably. There are 4 types of leather, and they are not all the same in quality. You have Full Grain Leather, Top Grain Leather, Genuine Leather and Bonded Leather.

We'll start with Bonded Leather. It's more of an insult to call Bonded Leather a leather. It's basically lots of different parts of leather glued and pressed together to make one piece, it's cheap, not at all durable and it will fall apart within weeks. In short, it's no good and we are completely against it.

Genuine Leather is in third place in the running and is the layer of the hide that remains after the top is taken off for the better quality leathers. This surface can often be given a makeover with a finish, sometimes a spray paint that can give it the look of a better quality. Not something that happens in our house. Don't settle for this, you can do better.

Top Grain Leather is the second highest grade that you'll find. A leather taken from the top layer of the hide, that is then treated, sanded and refined. It's a good quality leather, but not good enough for Hide and Drink. You can still do better, though, go one more step higher.

Full Grain Leather is the best you can get when it comes to leather, there's no competition here, and Hide and Drink is its biggest fan. Full Grain Leather comes from the top layer of the hide, and has all of the grain, hence its name. It's the best leather than you can buy, and the only leather that we use. You can stop looking now, you've found the cream of the crop.

The tanning process is something that we take pride in. Our rustic leather is created through removing the hair, extracting the moisture, taking out the oils and, of course, the natural preservatives. The leather is placed in a large container filled with new oils, coloring, and preservatives, and there it takes on its new color and thus its new personality. The finishing process consists of pressing the leather with heated plates, hung up to dry and sprayed and finished with a sealer. Finally, it is pressed once more and then ready for its transformation, in which it is carefully handcrafted by the diligent locals of Pastores, Guatemala, where our workshop is located.




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